Mornging Joe: Can Computer Vision Technology Help De-Militarize the Police and Provide Assistance?

There ha been an explosion of computer vision technology in the past few years or even the last decade or so considering OpenCV has been around that long. The recent events in Ferguson have created a need for keeping the police in line as well as the need to present credible evidence regarding certain situations.

Many police departments are starting to test programs that place snake cams like those used in the military on officers. While this could be viewed as more militarization, it also can present departments with a black eye if power is abused.

What if the lawyers, police, and ethics commissions could have a way of recognizing potentially dangerous situations before they happen? What if there was a light weight solution that allowed data programs to monitor situations in real or near real time, spot troublesome incidents, and provide alerts when situations were likely to get out of hand? What if potentially unethical situations could be flagged?

The answer is that this is possible without too much development already.

Statistical patterns can be used to predict behaviour long before anything happens. Microsoft and Facebook can accurately predict what you will be doing a year from now. The sad state of the current near police state is that the government has as much or more data on officers and citizens than Microsoft and Facebook.

These patterns can be used to narrow the video from those snake cams to potentially harmful situations for real time monitoring.

From there, a plethora of strong open source tools can be used to spot everything from weapons and the potential use of force, using the training capabilities of OpenCV and some basic kinematics (video is just a bunch of really quickly taken photos played in order), speech using Sphinx4 (a work in progress for captchas but probably not for clear speech), and even optical character recognition with pytesser. A bit of image pre-processing and OCR in Tesseract can already break nearly every captcha on the market in under one second with a single core and less than 2 gb of RAM. The same goes for using corner detection and OCR on a pdf table. Why can’t it be used in this situation?

The result in this case should be a more ethical police force and better safety to qualm the fears of officers and civilians alike.

Call me crazy but we can go deeper than just using snake cams on officers to police officers and provide assistance.  Quantum computing and/or better processors and graphics cards will only make this more of a reality.

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