The Case for Microservices, Where To Segment

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There is a growing need for microservices and shared services in the increasingly complex and vibrant set of technologies a true IT firm runs. Licensing, authentication, database services, ETL, reporting, analytics, information management, and the plethora of tasks being completed on the backend are impossible to accomplish in only a single application.

This article examines boundaries discovered through my own company’s experience in building microservice related applications.

Related Articles:

Discovering Sharable Resources in a Microservices Environment

Security in a Microservices Environment

Segment On Need and Resource Usage

To be fair, where segmentation of systems occurs depends on the need for each service. Clients may need a core set of tasks to be completed in one area or another. Where those needs diverge is a perfect boundary for establishing a service.

For instance, our clients need ETL, secured cloud file storage, data sharing, text management, FERPA/HIPP and legally compliant storage of data, analytics, data streaming, surveying, and reporting. Each of these areas encompasses one company or another but is cheaper done under a single roof to the tune of $7000 in savings per employee per year at a small to medium sized company.

Our boundaries are specified directly around needs, security, and resource costs. ETL encompasses one boundary due to computation costs, cloud storage another for security reasons, logging for legal compliance another, analytics takes up another service due to computational costs, stream and survey intake and initial analysis comprises another more vulnerable piece, and reporting yet another. Overlapping everything is a service for authorization and the authentication of access rights through oauth2.

The different services were chosen for one of the following factors:

  • resource cost
  • shared tasks and resources
  • legal compliance and security

Segmenting for Security

The modern world is growing increasingly security and privacy conscious. Including authentication systems and the storage of information on the same system as a web server is not recommended.

Microservices allow for individual applications to be separated and controlled. Access can be granted to specific clusters based on a firewall and authentication. Even user access control is easier to maintain. Hardware boundaries can be easily established between vulnerable pieces of a system.

Essentially, never stick a vulnerable frontend, streaming, or survey application on the same hardware as your potentially identifying initial file storage and always have some sort of authentication and access rights mechanism.

Results

Our boundaries are helping us scale. Simplr Insites, LLC dedicates individual resources as needed to each service. It also allows the company to offer a pricing scheme offering variable levels of services tailored to a customers needs more easily.

Some clients do not need an ETL system and only want case note management. That is possible. At the same time, granting GPU resources to the analytics cluster while giving our reporting cluster more RAM is as well.

In essence, Simplr Insites was able to reduce the cost of running systems in a 42 U shared space, possibly by as much as $5000 per month for our small company, while remaining more secure and delivering faster and tailored results based on the needs of clients through a single web frontend based SAAS application.

Conclusion

Discovering where to place microservice boundaries is critical to the success of an application. It relies on many factors ranging from resource cost, to the ability to share resources, and even legal compliance and security. Appropriate splitting of services can reduce cost and increase speed.

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